New Book News

Apophatic Elements in the Theory and Practice of Psychoanalysis: Pseudo-Dionysius and C.G.Jung by David Henderson published by Routledge.

How can the psychotherapist think about not knowing? Is psychoanalysis a contemplative prac-tice? This book explores the possibility that there are resources in philosophy and theology which can help psychoanalysts and psychotherapists think more clearly about the unknown and the unknowable.
The book applies the lens of apophasis to psychoanalysis, providing a detailed reading of apo-phasis in the work of Pseudo-Dionysius and exploring C.G. Jung’s engagement with apophatic discourse. Pseudo-Dionysius brought together Greek and biblical currents of negative theology and the via negativa, and the psychology of Jung can be read as a continuation and extension of the apophatic tradition. Henderson discusses the concept of the transcendent function as an apophatic dynamic at the heart of Jung’s thought, and suggests that apophasis can provide the key to understanding the family resemblance among the disparate schools of psychoanalysis.

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The Psychodynamics of Social Networking: Connected-up Instantaneous Culture and the Self by Aaron Balick published by Karnac Books. www.karnacbooks.com

Synopsis:

Over the past decade, the very nature of the way we relate to each other has been utterly transformed by online social networking and the mobile technologies that enable unfettered access to it. Our very selves have been extended into the digital world in ways previously unimagined, offering us instantaneous relating to others over a variety of platforms like Facebook and Twitter. In The Psychodynamics of Social Networking, Aaron Balick draws on his experience as a psychotherapist and cultural theorist to interrogate the unconscious motivations behind our online social networking use, powerfully arguing that social media is not just a technology but is essentially human and deeply meaningful.

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